Do you have multiple tracts, each with its own recital?
First you need to discover which tract is yours. Most lots or tracts of land do not stay the same size over the course of time. Your tract at one point either gained or lost acreage. If you find yourself with a deed that cites multiple tracts (clue: they may be referred to as Lot #1, Lot #2 etc) this means that the property now being sold was formed fully or partly from all the tracts listed. If you are certain your house was built prior to the date of the deed and if only one lot description contains the word messuage, it should be easy to determine which recital to follow back. If you are not certain the best option is to plot out each tract and match it with the plots from your previous deeds noting where your house currently stands in relation to the tract’s dimensions as you work your way back.

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1. Does the recital give you a grantor and grantee but leaves out the deed book and page reference?
2. Does the recital give a list of multiple transactions without specific references to some or all of those transactions?
3. Does the deed not have a recital at all?
4. Does the recital refer to a patent?
5. Does the recital refer to a will or an estate sale?
6. Does the recital refer to a Sheriff’s sale?
7. Do you have multiple tracts, each with its own recital?